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An audacious Black heavyweight champion was slated to defend his title against a white boxer in Reno, Nevada, on July 4, 1910. It was billed as “the fight of the century.”

The fight was seen as a referendum on racial superiority – and all hell was about to break loose in the racially divided United States.

Jack Johnson, the Black man, decisively beat James Jeffries, nicknamed “the Great White Hope.” Johnson’s triumph ignited bloody confrontations and violence between Blacks and whites throughout the country, leaving perhaps two dozen dead, almost all of them Black, and hundreds injured and arrested.

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African cities are among the fastest growing in the world, leading to rising demand for urban housing. Housing policies promoted by international organizations such as the World Bank since the 1980s have stimulated housing markets in order to address this demand. As a result, many of Africa’s major cities are being transformed by investment in urban real estate. But many also face a shortage of affordable housing for low-income residents.

In Ghana’s capital Accra, for example, there is an estimated deficit of 300,000 housing units. This is despite a construction boom in the city center. Over 300 acres (about 120 hectares) of state-owned land have been privatized and redeveloped since the 1990s.

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The early morning ritual of a shower had just ended and this reporter was dressing up when the alarm on the Asabo oil platform on the Atlantic Ocean off the Nigerian coast sounded off.  

My Asabo Platform oil rig room mate, Akinyele Okundare, a Newswatch magazine (a rested Nigerian newsmagazine) photographer trying unsuccessfully to mask his fear, asked: “Why should this – the alarm- be happening now that we are here?” This was at the cusp of the perennial spate of insurgency and militancy in Nigeria’s rich oil basin. And Akinyele’s fear was not unfounded.

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Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the global tourism industry contributed US$9.2 trillion, or 10.4%, to global GDP. It was considered one of the fastest-growing industries, accounting for at least one in every four new jobs globally.

Fast forward to 2021, and the pandemic has all but crippled the sector. Tourism demand – arrivals, travel, and the use of facilities and services – contracted by an estimated 74% in 2020. This has cost the industry upwards of US$1.3 trillion and has compromised millions of jobs.

The African region shed an estimated US$83 billion in GDP contribution (down by 49.2%), and lost up to 7.2 million industry jobs compared to 2019 levels.

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Music producers Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine have announced plans to open a Los Angeles high school that will focus on, among other things, inspiring students to become entrepreneurs. The public school, which will be part of the Los Angeles Unified School District, is set to open in fall of 2022 with 124 students and eventually grow to serve 250. Here, two hip-hop scholars – and one career and technical education scholar – weigh in on what the proposed school could mean for the American high school experience.

“When I look at the academy proposed by Dr. Dre and Jimmy Iovine, two things stand out – the location and the approach.” – Edmund Adjapong

They plan to open the school in the Los Angeles Unified School District, the second-largest school district in the nation. The district serves a population that is 74% Latino and 10% Black.

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Nervous. Concerned. Worried. Wary. Unprepared.

This is how middle and high school teachers have told me they have felt over the past few years when it comes to teaching the troublesome topic of slavery.

Although I work with teachers in Massachusetts, their reaction to teaching about slavery is common among teachers throughout the U.S.

Fortunately, in recent years there have been a growing number of individuals who have weighed in with useful advice.

Some, such as history professors Hasan Kwame Jeffries and Kenneth Greenberg, have advocated for helping students see the ways in which enslaved people fought back against the brutality of slavery.

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Setting goals and achieving them is the path that’s transformed one Olympic contender from a 17-year-old with a gig under the “golden arches” to a world-class athlete taking her shot at bringing home a gold medal at the Tokyo games.

Quanesha Burks was raised by her grandparents. As a teen, she worked long hours at McDonald’s, earning what she could to help support her family. Even so, she says she happily went to work each day because she saw her labors as an investment in a bigger game plan that included attending college.

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Hosanna Broadcasting Network (HBN), a California-based Christian broadcast media outlet known as “The Voice of Jesus Christ” has announced the launching “Our Turn”. a new honest, exciting, thought provoking, entertaining talk show which its management described as honest, thought-provoking and entertaining.

“Our Turn was incepted because of discussion between two of the hosts during the COVID 19 saga and riots that took place in our nation. The conversation turned to a reality and “Our Turn” was born”, according to the Chief Hostess, Ms. Tersit Asrat.  

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Shea Butter is packed with essential nutrients that enhance your natural complexion and help you glow from the inside out – all ingredients not found in their totality in any current cosmetic line, and brand. Shea Butter is  Nature’s gift to beauty and over thousands of years has been the  body beauty ritual of women (and men) everywhere.  

Below we list the benefits of Shea Butter.  Compare these with all the cosmetics, and brands you have been using.

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The U.S. Department of State released the 2021 Investment Situation Statements, (including all the African countries) which analyze the investment climates of more than 170 countries and economies that are current or potential markets for U.S. companies. The reports provide up-to-date information gathered by the economic officers in the U.S. embassies and consulates around the world – helping U.S. companies make informed business decisions. They also serve as a reference in working with partner governments to create enabling environments that are not only economically sound but also adhere to high standards, like protecting the environment and respecting human rights, including worker rights. Readers can also access points of contact within each U.S. mission for additional follow-up and consultation.

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Two presses of a design evolved to print newspapers in India are at the heart of a project to improve literacy in Ethiopia.

Working with sales partner VIP Systems, manroland Goss has commissioned two Cromoman presses at TBO Printing and Publishing in the country’s first textbook printing plant.

Bookbinding equipment and a Rotoman heat set press are set to follow. The ambitious project – delayed by the COVID-19 pandemic – achieves Ethiopia’s aim of using its own resources to meet the high demand for textbooks for a steadily growing number of young people and will see prime minister and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr Abiy Ahmed attend the opening ceremony.

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Before the COVID-19 pandemic, the global tourism industry contributed US$9.2 trillion, or 10.4%, to global GDP. It was considered one of the fastest-growing industries, accounting for at least one in every four new jobs globally.

Fast forward to 2021, and the pandemic has all but crippled the sector. Tourism demand – arrivals, travel, and the use of facilities and services – contracted by an estimated 74% in 2020. This has cost the industry upwards of US$1.3 trillion and has compromised millions of jobs.

The African region shed an estimated US$83 billion in GDP contribution (down by 49.2%), and lost up to 7.2 million industry jobs compared to 2019 levels.

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With a projected median age of 19.7 years by 2050, one in three young people will live in Sub-Saharan Africa. … Faced with staggering youth unemployment and widespread dissatisfaction with the performances of their governments, young Africans are growing restless.

This restlessness is manifested in the form of increasing tensions between an entrenched patronage-based, autocratic political leadership and an expanding, increasingly educated and connected cohort of youth demanding reform and greater political openness.

Without a path for reform, youth will despair, and conditions will further deteriorate, possibly leading to more instability and conflict. Yet, most African youth have not chosen the path of violence.

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Tourist arrivals in the continent fell nearly 70 per cent in 2020, which had a severe economic impact in countries dependent on the travel sector

 Travellers from China, one of the largest sources of tourists, slow to return as they opt to travel domestically and global pandemic containment continues.

Before the coronavirus struck, Sam Kombe would receive tens and sometimes hundreds of Chinese visitors to Tanzania per month, traveling to the east African nation to sample safari tourism.

Kombe owns Safari Infinity, a tour company in Arusha, in the country’s north, and Nyumbani Collection, a safari camp in the Serengeti, which is famed for its annual wildebeest migration.

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The article below appeared on the pages of The Black Meetings and Tourism Magazine, researched and published under the direction of its Editor-In-Chief, Solomon J. Herbert.  The Black Meetings and Tourism was established in 1994 and has become America’s leading tourism and meetings media voice of the African American market. 

The lack of racial diversity and inclusion in the hospitality/travel/meetings industry has resulted in only a handful of Black-owned public relations firms and advertising agencies actually having a seat at the table and influence over creative content.

Not surprisingly, that deficiency directly affects the narrative and images of the Black culture, resulting in the ineffective creation of messaging and campaigns targeting Blacks.

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In the U.S. Public Health Service Syphilis Study at Tuskegee (1932-1972), more than 600 Black men were told they were being treated for “bad blood” but were not actually given any medical care. Penicillin was widely available as an effective remedy for syphilis, but the men were denied treatment, as part of the study parameters and protocols.

When the details of the study came to light in the early 1970s it sparked a wave of reforms in medicine and public health. In 1974, the National Research Act was signed into law with other sweeping regulations. Since then, laws require all medical studies or clinical trials to ensure transparency and get voluntary informed consent from all participants.

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Twenty eight year-old Onyeka Orie, looks the picture of happiness in his mobile phone accessories shop at the sprawling Computer Village in Nigeria’s main city, Lagos. The shop and everything in it had been given to him by his former boss after Mr. Orie worked for him without payment for several years, learning the trade.

“I served my oga [boss] for eight years. My oga gave me this shop. I had been managing the shop for four years before he gave it to me. I didn’t expect it,” an excited Mr Orie says.

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Think of your favorite former male soccer player from Europe. You probably remember beautiful goals, unbelievable saves, fighting spirit. What is he doing now? Coaching? Or is he a player agent? Perhaps a sports commentator?

Now think of your favorite former male soccer player who migrated from an African country to play in Europe. He probably evokes similar images of fantastic playing. But what is he doing now? Do not know? Please don’t cheat and say it was George Weah, winner of the Ballon D’Or award in 1995 and now president of Liberia.

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Ewetse Khama,  a PR executive with the APO Group, a major Pan-African Public Relations firm has traded in his career to claim his birthright and to serve his people as a member of a prominent royal family in Botswana. PRESS HERE TO READ MORE & Ewetse’s chance meeting with our editor-in-chief, Charles Anyiam in Doha, Qatar..

To some, it might seem like an unusual career trajectory, but for Ewetse Khama, working in the Public Relations industry in Africa has been the perfect preparation for the next step in his unique journey.

Recently, Ewetse stepped down from his role at APO Group (www.APO-opa.com), the pan-African communications consultancy and press release distribution service, to serve his country and his people.

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The revelation recently by the Innocence Project and American Civil Liberties Union that DNA and fingerprint evidence did not match Ledell Lee, a Black man executed in 2017 for the murder of a white woman, is part of a larger issue that we rarely discuss. Too many Black men face false accusations without true redemption or justice.

With all the protests for police and judicial reform, the rising issue of false accusations is buried in our conversations and focus on addressing blue bravado and the immunities afforded to prosecutors, judges, and clerks of the court. We must provide protection under the law for a group of victims that are truly voiceless, the falsely accused.

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Hanging on the wall in my office is the framed cover of the inaugural issue of The Brownies’ Book, a monthly periodical for Black youths created by W.E.B. Du Bois and other members of the NAACP in 1920.

The magazine – the first of its kind – includes poems and stories that speak of Black achievement and history, while also showcasing children’s writing.

Although much of American children’s literature published near the turn of the last century – and even today – filters childhood through the eyes of white children, The Brownies’ Book gave African American children a platform to explore their lives, interests, and aspirations. 

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The Nigerian state is intricately laced with violent threads, woven into it by its colonial, military and ethnic setup.

The Nigeria-Biafra war of 1967 to 1970 was both an outcome and a symptom of this configuration. This violent setup of the state is partly why the Biafran question remains an open sore. It has engendered heated activism in the country by groups like the Indigenous People of Biafra whose activism has often collided with the firepower of the state.

The Igbos are one of three largest ethnic groups in Nigeria, situated in the southeast. Feelings of collective trauma and a lack of justice after the war have deepened their grievances and reinforced agitations for Biafra…

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Before the coronavirus struck, Sam Kombe would receive tens and sometimes hundreds of Chinese visitors to Tanzania per month, traveling to the east African nation to sample safari tourism.

Kombe owns Safari Infinity, a tour company in Arusha, in the country’s north, and Nyumbani Collection, a safari camp in the Serengeti, which is famed for its annual wildebeest migration.

Safari Infinity was getting many bookings from mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore before coronavirus infections were detected in Tanzania, those locations accounting for about 30 per cent of the guests.

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James Meredith was walking down Highway 51 just south of Hernando, Mississippi. It was June 6, 1966, the second day of his planned 220-mile trek from Memphis to Jackson, which he undertook to encourage Black people to overcome racist intimidation and to register to vote.

As cars filled with newspaper reporters and police officers rolled nearby, he walked a sloping stretch of road lined with pine trees. He heard a shout: “James Meredith! James Meredith!”

A white man in a roadside gully lifted his shotgun, aimed at Meredith, and fired. Meredith was hit and crawled across the road, his eyes wide with panic. As he splayed onto the gravel shoulder of Highway 51, blood-soaked through the back of his shirt.

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Africa is a destination that boasts some of the world’s most gorgeous landscapes, friendliest people and eco-friendly wildlife experiences. The food scene is equally impressive. Let us take you on a foodie journey through Africa; you may wish to take notes!

South Africa

The country is famed for its multicultural food experiences. Sink your teeth into a bunny chow, a hollowed-out bread filled with a curry of your choice, or a shisanyama with braai meat and sides. In Bo-Kaap, enjoy a Cape Malay curry. For dessert, sample the country’s malva pudding and milk tart.

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The recent “joint declaration” of the Namibian and German governments on dealing with the 1904-08 genocide marks the first time a former colonial power has officially offered an apology to another country for state sponsored mass crimes.

The agreement stipulates that Germany will pay €1.1bn for development projects in Namibia over the next 30 years.

Some pundits consider the accord a potential template for efforts towards post-colonial reconciliation for other former colonies and colonial powers.

We recognise that this is the first time that a former colonial power has admitted an historical injustice on a state-to-state level.

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In a White House memo dated Tuesday, January 28, 1969 to President Nixon, former Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger describes the Igbos as “the wandering Jews of West Africa-gifted, aggressive, westernized, at best envied and resented, but mostly despised by their neighbors in the federation”(foreign relations document, volume E-5, documents on Africa 1969-1972).

Kissinger’s description aptly portrays the Christian Igbos and their experience in Nigeria. Over the years, the Igbos have been the victims of numerous massacres, that they have lost count. Most of the violence directed against the Igbos have been state-sponsored.

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A bill to return a scenic beachfront property in Manhattan Beach in Los Angeles County, California to the descendants of a Black couple who once operated a vibrant resort there was unanimously approved by the California state Senate.

The Bruce’s Beach bill now goes to the California state Assembly for approval. The long-awaited legislation would return the property to the Bruce family after nearly a century.

The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously April 20, this year to direct the county’s CEO to come up with a plan to return the property. That step was required to make the land transfer possible.

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The United States is a strong partner with African nations, supporting public health and economic growth across the continent.

Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs Akunna Cook told an Africa Day celebration May 25 that the Biden administration is committed to advancing America’s long-standing partnerships with African nations.

“We believe in the nations of Africa,” she said in virtual remarks at the event, hosted by the African Union’s Mission to the United States and attended by diplomats from African countries. “The United States stands ready to be a partner to you in solidarity, support, and mutual respect.”

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African Ancestry the Black-owned pioneers of genetic ancestry tracing for people of African descent, today announced an unprecedented partnership with the Sierra Leone government through the Ministry of Tourism and Cultural Affairs and its facilitating agency The Monuments and Relics Commission that formalizes a citizenship offering for customers whose ancestry trace to the fifth most peaceful country in Africa. 

“We welcome you to acquire land, live in our communities, invest, build capacity and take advantage of business opportunities,” said President Bio during the citizenship conferment ceremony.

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The House Judiciary Committee voted on April 14, 2021, to recommend the creation of a commission to study the possibility of paying reparations to the descendants of enslaved people in the United States.

The measure, H.R. 40, would establish a 15-person commission to offer a “national apology” for slavery, study its long-term effects and submit recommendations to Congress on how to compensate African Americans.

Any federal reparations bill faces long odds of being enacted due to Republican opposition, but this is the furthest this effort has advanced since a similar bill was first introduced over 30 years ago.

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On an Ethiopian Airlines flight from Los Angeles to Addis Ababa en route to the Seychelles Islands, passengers were welcomed aboard by the mellifluous voice of a hostess; first in the nation’s Amharic dialect, followed by English and Mandarin versions.

For some passengers, it was a strange sequence on vinyl.

However, for Charles Anyiam, Publisher of The African Times-USA, the announcement in Amharic, even though he does not understand the language, was a symbol of African pride, and for him, an Igbo, which is one of the major languages in his native Nigeria, that moment was empowering.

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The United States and Europe are both facing “common challenges, arrays of inequalities,” and “tensions” within their societies when it comes to racism, French President Emmanuel Macron said in a recent interview on CBS’s “Face the Nation” program that aired April 25. And while this is something both have in common, it’s important to note that their “histories are very different,” he said.

“The way we behaved in the past, the way we built our own trauma, are very different,” Macron said.

“[The U.S.] had segregation and managed to precisely react and reorganize your society in the 60s with positive and affirmative action and nuclear policies in order to deal with this phenomenon. 

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Court TV viewing peaked April 20 between 4:30-5:30 p.m. ET – during which time the verdicts were read – at 402K viewers 2+. Court TV was ranked in the top 15 ahead of such networks as ID, ESPN, TBS, TNT, FX, Discovery Channel and 100 others in viewers 2+ when compared with ad-supported cable networks 4:30-5:30 p.m. ET April 20.

April 20 was the most-watched day since Court TV was rebooted in May 2019 with increases as high as +10 times the pre-Chauvin trial time period average. The network’s trial coverage itself was up more than +330 percent.

In terms of streaming viewing, Court TV was up more than 20 times for the trial and more than 40 times for the verdict versus the pre-trial average.

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Pineapple, or Ananas, as this delicious fruit is called in all the non-English speaking countries ls turned into fashionable shoes by three enterprising students in Nairobi, Kenya.

Pine Kazi as a company established in 2019 by three passionate young students in Nairobi, Kenya won the Fashionomics Africa Competition organized by the Africa Development Bank (AfDB) and administered by Parsons School of Design, the eminent fashion design power center. Fashionomics Africa had many entries from across Africa. The contest search was designed to support Africa’s entrepreneurship and creative development concepts, plus identify investment-worthy projects that have a solid business basis and address social and environmental challenges. 

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Derek Chauvin’s criminal trial is over, but the work to ensure that no one endures a tragic death like George Floyd’s is just getting started.

It is fair to say that race was on the minds of millions of protesters who took to the streets last year to express their outrage and pain in response to the killing. Many felt it was impossible for someone who wasn’t Black to imagine Chauvin’s brutal treatment of George Floyd.

But race went practically unmentioned during the Chauvin trial.

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In the dying days of 2014  during the Nigerian presidential elections, and as I worked on a column for a Nigerian news magazine – Tell –  I had read an inflammatory dispatch by Reuters on the same elections. I paraphrased my thoughts essentially with:   “Here we go into another season of headlines by foreign news organizations that inflame, and do not correspond with the body of the story.”

For historical perspectives, the Reuters article was titled: “Nigeria election tensions raise the specter of a break-up.”

The story or opinion piece by a correspondent, Tim Cocks seemed like a patchwork of political views and analysis from around the country indicating tension and frictions that usually precede political seasons anywhere in the world.

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Students from across the country between the ages of 8 and 12 are encouraged to read a financial literacy book of their choosing, and either write a 250-word essay or create an art project to show how they would apply what they learned from the book to their daily lives. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by June 30, 2021. The Bank will choose ten winners and award each winner a $1,000 savings account at OneUnited Bank by August 31, 2021. For more information, please visit: www.oneunited.com/book.

Teri Williams, OneUnited Bank President and author of “I Got Bank! What My Granddad Taught Me About Money, wrote the book when she found that there weren’t enough books geared toward educating urban youth about finances.

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The well-connected lawyer Jude Kearney is backing the US-Africa Energy Forum 2021, whose aim is to promote greater American business involvement in Africa – a continent where the Chinese are currently omnipresent.

The founder of Kearney Africa Legal Advisors, the lawyer Jude Kearney, is seeking to encourage American businesses to invest in Africa’s energy sector. Facing stiff competition from China in this domain, Washington has been trying to even up the playing field through a string of diplomatic and commercial initiatives.

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Selected petitions and written correspondence between Igbo women and British officials between 1892 and 1960 shed fresh light on how women navigated male-dominated colonial institutions and structures of the time.

African women acted in varied and complex ways to the situations they found themselves in. This ranged from subtle to overt opposition, and sometimes violent resistance.

One response was through petition writing as women took to the pen to articulate their concerns. In my research, I examined several petitions written by Igbo women to British officials during the colonial period. I found that petition writing was part of the complex power politics between the women and the colonial state.

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Brazil is undergoing a strange racial reckoning after bombshell revelations that thousands of veteran politicians had changed their self-identified race between the 2016 and 2020 elections.

Afro-Brazilians – a category that includes Black and mixed-race people – comprise 56% of Brazil’s population but 43% of elected officials. So when almost 29,000 Afro-Brazilian city council and mayoral candidates took office on Jan. 1 after winning their races last November, communities of color celebrated their growing political representation.

But Brazilian politics may not be as diverse as official statistics suggest.

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Grid Or Solar: Which Best Serves As Energy Solution For Rural Africa’s Needs?

South Asia has made tremendous progress in connecting rural areas to the electricity grid but the number of people in Africa without access has scarcely changed since 2010. More than half a billion people in Africa don’t have access to electricity, meaning the continent hosts 72% of the world’s non-electrified population. The UN Sustainable Development Goals have set a universal goal of ensuring access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all by 2030. To achieve this, the continent will require a big electrification push.

But what kind of electricity makes sense in rural Africa to make the most of available budgets? Over the past decade or so, a range of new off-grid solar products has emerged.

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How France Extorted Haiti For The Greatest Heist In History

Haiti officially declared its independence from France in 1804. In October 1806, the country was split into two, with Alexandre Pétion ruling in the south and Henry Christophe ruling in the north. Despite the fact that both of Haiti’s rulers were veterans of the Haitian Revolution, the French had never quite given up on reconquering their former colony.

 In 1814 King Louis XVIII, who had helped overthrow Napoléon earlier that year, sent three commissioners to Haiti to assess the willingness of the country’s rulers to surrender. Christophe, having made himself a king in 1811, remained obstinate in the face of France’s exposed plan to bring back slavery. 

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Africa And France: An Unfulfilled Dream Of Independence?

“Sixty years on, francophone countries in Africa still do not have true independence and freedom from France,” says Nathalie Yamb, adviser to Ivory Coast’s Freedom and Democracy Party (LIDER). Even the content of school textbooks is often still determined by France, she added.

But more importantly, the political system in many of the countries was introduced by France. “Shortly before independence, France decided to abolish the parliamentary system in some countries like Ivory Coast and introduce a presidential regime in which all territories and powers are in the hands of the head of state,” Yamb told DW. 

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